Spheres in perspective

When I teach my workshop on 3D vision, the students also play with a 3D graphics framework called Scene Kit. It is very powerful and easy to use. With just a few lines of code they can create a vivid 3D scene. At some point in the tutorial, the student has created a scene with a red sphere on a grey shiny floor against a deep blue sky. Then they start playing with the controls, changing the distance, rotating the scene, or panning to the side. Invariably someone pushed the sphere to one of the corners of the image and then checks with me whether there is a mistake in the code. Continue reading “Spheres in perspective”

3/4 view

The three guys in the painting below are all depictions of King Charles I, painted from different viewpoints by Anthonis van Dyck in 1636. In the middle we see a frontal view (“en face”), on the left a side view (“en profile”), and the most intriguing is the one on the right: the three-quarter view (“en trois quarts”). So here is the question that has bugged me for some time. Why is it called three-quarter, or 3/4? Three quarters of what? Continue reading “3/4 view”

In perspective

Being skilled in the art of drawing a convincing scene in linear perspective is no guarantee anymore for a successful career. For roughly four centuries this was a pretty good tool to have in your kit as a visual artist – from the moment that Filippo Brunelleschi gave his demonstration of a perspective rendering of the Baptistery in Florence in 1425, right up until Joseph Nicéphore Niépce took the first photograph of a view from a window in Saint-Loup-de-Varennes in 1826.

Continue reading “In perspective”

Three-quarter view

The three guys in the painting above are all depictions of King Charles I, painted from different viewpoints by Anthonis van Dyck in 1636. In the middle we see a frontal view (“en face”), on the left a side view (“en profile”), and the most intriguing is the one on the right: the three-quarter view (“en trois quarts”). So here is the question that has bugged me for some time. Why is it called three-quarter, or 3/4? Three quarters of what?

Continue reading “Three-quarter view”